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McMINNVILLE 
COLLEGE 

•1893=4- 



If you do not wish to preserve this Catalogue please give It to some 
Young Man or Woman who ought to go to College 



McMINNVlLLE 
COLLEGE... 



McMINNVlLLE 
OREGON... 




ANNUAL CATALOGUE 



.1893-4... 



PRINTED FOR THE COLLEGE 



... McMINNVlLLE COLLEGE ... 



DOES IT PAY TO ESTABLISH AND BUILD UP COLLEGES? 

"Planting colleges and filling them with studious young men and 
women is planting seed corn for the world." — Adoniram Judson. 

A college that makes a "glorious union of the highest learning with 
the deepest piety, is a light to lighten the nations and the glory of our 
Israel." — George W. Eaton. 

Is a College Education Helpful to Success in Business Life? 

"My own class in Harvard College numbered eighty-nine at gradu- 
ation. Eleven of that number, or one-eighth of the whole, have at- 
tained remarkable success in business. * * * In eastern 
Massachusetts graduates of Harvard get greatly more than their numer- 
ical proportion of the best places in banking, insurance, transportation 
and manufacturing. * * I speak from no little personal obser- 
vation when I say that there is no more striking general fact about the 
graduates of Harvard during the past fifty years than their eminent suc- 
cess in business. From one-fifth to one-third of the members of the 
successive graduating classes ultimately go into business. The same is 
probably true of many another American college." — President Elliott 
of Harvard University. 

Will It Pay to Send the Girls to College? 

"Hardly a week passes that fathers and mothers and teachers do 
not ask me whether it will pay to send some bright, ambitious girl to 
college. There is but one answer : If civilization pays, if education is 
not a mistake, if hearts and brains and souls are more than the dress 
they wear, then, by every interest dear to a Christian republic, by all 
the hope we have of building finer characters than former generations 
have produced, give the girls the widest and the highest and the deepest 
education we have dreamed of, and then regret that it is not better, 
broader and deeper. The civilization of the Anglo-Saxon race in Amer- 
ica depends upon the education physical, mental, moral and social of 
the women for the next fifty years." — Alice Freeman Palmer. 



.. McMINNVILLE COLLEGE ... 



THE BAPTIST COLLEGE 

At McMinnville was chartered by the Legislature of 1858=9. 

It is under the control of the Baptist Denomination of Oregon. 

It has Endowment enough so that it can make Tuition and other 
Fees very low. 

Its aim is to offer to young men and women the best Educa= 
tion possible at the least possible expense to them. 

It has a Collegiate, Preparatory and Musical department, and six 
Courses of study; three leading to Degrees and three Iead= 
ing to Certificates of Graduation. 

Information as to Expenses, Courses of Study and Advantages 
will be found in this Catalogue. 



'A ::::::: fa 



Calendar 1893=4 

First Term begins Tuesday, September 19, 1893 

Second Term begins Monday, December 11, 1893 

Holiday Vacation December 23, 1893 — January 1, 1894 

Third Term begins Monday, March 19, 1894 

Educational and Baccalaureate Sermons Sunday, June 3, 1894 

Seventh Annual Exhibition Philergian Society June 4, 1894 

Educational Address June 5, 1894 

Students' Reunion June 6, 1894 

Ivy Exercises June 7, 1894 

Commencement June 7 , 1894 

Calendar 1894=5 

First Term begins Tuesday, September 18, 1894 

Second Term begins Monday, December 10, 1894 

Holiday Vacation Dec. 22, 1894— Jan. 1, 1895 

Third Term begins Monday, March 18, 1895 



... McMINNVILLB COLLEGE ... 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



TERM EXPIRES JUNE, 1895. 

Rev. A.J. Hunsaker McMinnville 

Amasa Sanders " 

J. E. Magers 

REV. C. A. Woody Portland 

Rev. R. D. Grant 

Rev. J. H. Teale 

TERM EXPIRES JUNE, 1896. 

Hon. W. C. Johnson, L. L. D Oregon City 

Hon. Henry Failing Portland 

Hon. Joseph Cravens Independence 

D. C. LaTourette Oregon City 

N. J. Blagen Portland 

O. P. Coshow McMinnville 

TERM EXPIRES JUNE, 1897. 

Rev. M. L. Rugg Salem 

Hon. J. N. Dolph Portland 

A. C. Chandler McMinnville 

John H. Smith Astoria 

B. F. Rhodes McMinnville 

John Wennerberg Carlton 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

J. E. Magers A. J. Hunsaker Amasa Sanders 

O. P. Coshow A. C. Chandler 

Financial Agent, Rev. A. J. Hunsaker 



McMINNVILLE COLLEGE ... 



FACULTY 



T. G. BROWNSON, President. 

English Literature, Latin, Philosophy, 

EMANUEL NORTHUP, 

Mathematics, Greek, Psychology. 

Mrs. T. G. BROWNSON, 

French, German, English. 

W. F. FARGO, 

Sciences, Rhetoric, History. 

Mrs. F. E. WOLFENDEN, 

Elocution, Music, Calisthenics. 

EMANUEL NORTHUP, 

Librarian. 



The names of the Faculty appear in the order of their appointment. 



... McMINNVILLE COLLEGE ... 



THE COURSES OF STUDY 



The courses of study offered in the Literary department are the 
Classical, the Scientific, the Normal, the Literary and the Business 
courses. They are given in full on the following pages. Attention is 
called to the fact that the principle of ELECTIVE STUDIES is here 
offered in its best form — a choice between courses of study. These 
courses have been marked out with great care and are believed to be 
fully equal, in the ground they cover, to similar courses in the very best 
schools of the United States. McMinnville College does not claim to 
be a university; it is a college, and here offers choice courses of study 
in those subjects that legitimately belong to the college. 

The aim of the college is to give such discipline of the mental 
powers as is essential to the highest success in business life, and at the 
same time to give a fair mastery of the branches that are here taught. 
To-day hundreds who expect to enter business life, as well as those who 
are looking toward the professions, are anxious to secure the broadest 
culture and the most thorough mental training. A brief description of 
the courses of study is here presented : 

The Classical Course gives a prominent place to Greek, Latin and 
Mathematics. A thorough study of mathematics is universally 
recognized as of the highest value. The Latin and Greek languages 
are unsurpassed store houses of intellectual strength. This course also 
furnishes opportunity for the study of French, German, Literature, 
History, Psychology and Philosophy. 

The Scientific Course retains the mathematics and Latin of the 
Classical course, but offers special advantages in the sciences and the 
modern languages. Chemistry, Botany, Physics, Zoology, Geology 
and Astronomy are given a prominent place during the last three years 
of the course. Text-books are used, but many experiments are given 
and much work done outside of the text-book. It is believed that this 
course as now offered is deserving of the heartiest patronage, and is 
especially recommended to prospective students. 



... McMINNVILLE COLLEGE .. 



The Normal Course differs from the Scientific in that professional 
studies hold a prominent place in the senior year. The aim of this 
course is to give both mental discipline and professional knowledge 
together with such a mastery of the branches here studied as will fit the 
teacher for the highest position in public school work. The second 
and third-rate positions in public school work are overcrowded, but 
there is a strong and increasing demand for thoroughly equipped 
teachers. The course here offered is not a short and easy course. It 
will require four years of hard work to complete it. Teachers who 
expect to secure and hold prominent and well-paid positions in the 
public school, cannot afford to take a shorter course than this. Those 
completing either the Classical, Scientific, or the Normal course will be 
eligible to the state diploma as provided for by the legislature of 1891. 

The Literary Course is a carefully prepared course that can be 
completed in three years, and is offered to those who are not able to 
remain in school a longer time. It gives a fair amount of Latin and 
mathematics, and furnishes a considerable knowledge of the sciences 
and German. 

The Business Course offers a superior business education. "What- 
ever may be your choice of a business pursuit, it should be remembered 
that the better you are qualified for it, the more likely you will be to 
succeed in it. It is a fact which cannot have escaped the notice of 
anyone who has given the matter any thought, that those who are the 
best educated for their business calling (other things being equal) 
invariably take the highest positions." These sentences from the pen 
of a prominent business man deserve the careful study of the youth of 
to-day. It is beyond dispute that a thorough business education is a 
prerequisite to eminent success in business life. Such an education 
cannot be obtained without close application and persistent study, and 
it cannot be obtained in a few short months. The course here offered 
requires two years of hard study to complete it, but it is none too 
thorough for those to master who expect to take prominent positions in 
business life. 



... McMINNVILLB COLLEGE ... 



ADMISSION 

To enter the Classical, Scientific, Normal, or Literary course, 
students will be required to pass a satisfactory examination in the 
studies of the College Preparatory course found on Page 16, or to furnish 
satisfactory evidence that they have fairly mastered these branches. 
Especial attention is called to the fact that the mastery of the common 
branches lies at the basis of all successful work in the studies pursued 
in the college course. Students deficient in reading, spelling, arith- 
metic and English grammar, will be especially crippled in higher 
branches, if allowed to enter upon them. To students who are deficient 
in any of the common branches, the College Preparatory course 
offers superior advantages under teachers of ability and wide experience. 



SPECIAL STUDIES 

Many students are so situated that they cannot see their way to take 
a regular course. To such students the best of advantages are offered 
to take such studies as they are fitted to pursue. Such students will 
have just as thorough instruction and just as good opportunities in 
every respect as those taking a regular course. Attention, however, is 
called to the fact that as a rule students receive more benefit by entering 
upon a regular course, even if they cannot see # their way to complete 
that course. 



DEGREES 

The degree of Bachelor of Science is conferred upon those who 
complete the Scientific course; that of Bachelor of Literature, upon 
those who complete either the Classical or the Normal course, and a 
certificate of graduation, upon those who complete the Literary or the 
Business course. 



... McMlNNVlLLE COLLEGE ... 



TRAINING OF TEACHERS 

The demand for college graduates to fill the best salaried positions 
in the public schools is increasing year by year. The day is close at 
hand when thousands of teachers must secure a better preparation for 
their work, or be crowded out by the better equipped teachers our 
colleges are educating. The public school is widening its course of 
study; one branch after another is added; it does not take the eye of a 
prophet to see that the elements of the various sciences are soon to be 
taught in the common school. All this means that the successful 
teacher must have a much more extensive education than most teachers 
to-day possess. To encourage college graduates to enter public school 
work, state legislatures are granting them state diplomas; a privilege 
until recently granted only to Normal schools. McMinnville College 
in its Normal course offers superior advantages to those who are to 
make teaching a specialty. That course is a thorough one but none too 
thorough for those who expect to be eminently successful in public 
school work. 



LEGISLATIVE ENACTMENT 

Be it enacted by the legislative assembly of the State of Oregon, 
That all persons who shall complete a required course of study and 
receive a literary degree therefor in any institution of learning of 
collegiate or university grade, chartered or incorporated under 
the laws of this state, and shall have passed such examination 
thereon as may be approved by the State Board of Education, shall be 
entitled to receive a State Diploma, as is now authorized by law, and 
after six years of successful teaching in the State of Oregon, shall be 
entitled to the State Life Diploma, as now provided by law, when they 
shall have paid the required fee for said diploma. 

Six members of the senior class were applicants for the State 
Diploma in harmony with this law and all were successful. 



10 



... McMINNVlLLB COLLEGE .. 



CLASSICAL COURSE 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



FALL TERM 


WINTER TERM 




SPRING TERM 


Arithmetic 


Algebra 




Algebra 


Caesar 


Caesar 




Caesar 


English Grammar 


Rhetoric 




Rhetoric 


English Literature 


General His! 


:ory 


Botany 


General History 









SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



Algebra 


- Algebra 


Algebra 


Cicero 


Cicero 


Cicero 


English Literature 


English Literature 


American Literature 


Greek Reader 


Greek Reader 


Xenophon 


» 


JUNIOR YEAR 




Geometry 


Geometry 


Geometry 


Virgil 


Virgil 


Virgil 


Xenophon 


Homer 


Homer 


German 


German 


German 



Trigonometry 
Political Economy 
Herodotus 
Christian Evidences 



SENIOR YEAR 

Trig, and Surveying 

Livy 

Heiodotus 

Bible Study 

French 



Psychology 

Horace 

Sophocles 

Moral Philosophy 



... McMlNNVlLLE COLLEGE ... 



11 



SCIENTIFIC COURSE 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



FALL TERM 


WINTER TERM 


SPRING TERM 


Arithmetic 


Algebra 


Algebra 


Caesar 


Caesar 


Caesar 


English Grammar 


Rhetoric 


Rhetoric 


English Literature 


General History 


Botany 


General History 







SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Algebra 


Algebra 


Algebra 


Cicero 


Cicero 


Cicero 


English Literature 


English Literature 


American Literature 


Botany 


Chemistry 

JUNIOR YEAR 


Chemistry 


Geometry 


Geometry 


Geometry 


Virgil 


Virgil 


Virgil 


German 


German 


German 


Physics 


Physics 

SENIOR YEAR 


Zoology 


German 


Livy 


Horace 


Political Economy 


French 


French 


Trigonometry 


Trig, and Surveying 


Psychology 


Geology 


Astronomy 


Astronomy 



12 



McMINNVILLE COLLEGE.. 



NORMAL COURSE 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



FALL TERM 


WINTER TERM 


SPRING TERM 


Arithmetic 


Algebra 


Algebra 


Caesar 


Caesar 


Caesar 


English Grammar 


Rhetoric 


Rhetoric 


English Literature 


General History. 


Botany 


General History 







Algebra 

Cicero 

English Literature 

Botany 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Algebra 

Cicero 

English Literature 

Chemistry 



Algebra 

Cicero 

American Literature 

Chemistry 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Geometry 


Geometry 


Geometry 


Virgil 


Virgil 


Virgil 


German 


German 


German 


Physics 


Physics 


Zoology 



SENIOR YEAR 



Political Economy 

Geology 

Hist. Education 

Book-Keeping 



French 
Astronomy 
School Management 
Art of Teaching 



French 
Psychology 
Astronomy 
Oreg. School Law 



McMINNVILLE COLLEGE ... 



/.? 



LITERARY COURSE 





FIRST YEAR 




FALL TERM 


• 

WINTER TERM 


SPRING TERM 


Arithmetic 


Algebra 


Algebra 


Caesar 


Caesar 


Caesar 


English Grammar 


Rhetoric 


Rhetoric 


English Literature 


General History 


Botany 


General History 







SECOND YEAR 



Algebra 


Algebra 


Algebra 


Cicero 


Cicero 


Cicero 


English Literature 


English Literature 


American Literature 


Botany 


Chemistry 

THIRD YEAR 


Chemistry 


Virgil 


Virgil 


Virgil 


German 


German 


German 


Physics 


Physics 


Zoology 


Geology 


Astronomy 


Astronomy 



14 



.. McMINNVILLE COLLEGE 



BUSINESS COURSE 



FIRST YEAR 



FALL TERM 

Arithmetic 
English Grammar 
English Literature 
General History 



WINTER TERM 

Algebra 
Rhetoric 
Book Keeping 
General History 



SPRING TERM 

Algebra 

Rhetoric 

Botany 

Com. Arithmetic 

Book Keeping 



Botany 
Algebra 
Geometry 
English Literature 
Book Keeping 



SECOND YEAR 

Algebra 
Geometry 
Chemistry 
English Literature 
Commercial Law 



Albebra 
Geometry 

American Literature 
Chemistry 
Book Keeping 



... McMlNNVILLE COLLEGE ... IS 



BASIS OF WORK AND SUBJECTS COVERED 

The courses of study as outlined above will be followed as closely as 
the best interest of each student justifies. Our work is planned on the 
basis of twenty recitations a week for each student, with a minimum 
preparation of an hour and a half of hard study for each recitation. In 
addition to this, each student is expected to spend an average of two 
hours a week in vocal music, English composition, elocution and direct 
preparation for the Philergian society. To our utpmost ability, consist- 
ent with the highest advantages of the students as a body, the principle 
of allowing each student to complete the course as rapidly as thorough- 
ness allows, will be put into practice. Students so lame in common 
branches as to hinder their progress in higher studies; students who 
cannot get at least seven hours a day for hard study; students whose 
health does not permit them to do that amount of study; students who 
wish to give special attention to music or elocution, will be allowed to 
take fifteen recitations a week instead of twenty. This principle of 
allowing each student to go as rapidly as is consistent with thoroughness 
of work, has been under discussion for several years. More and more 
has our experience convinced us that the best interests of the students 
as individuals and as a body will be subserved by carrying this principle 
into practice, although it may add to the work of the teachers. They, 
however, are a unit in undertaking to put this principle into practice. 

A sufficiently definite idea of the subjects covered can be obtained 
by showing the amount required to complete the scientific course. To 
graduate from this course the following work is required : in mathe- 
matics, Wentworth's High School Arithmetic, Wentworth's Higher 
Algebra, Wentworth's Plane and Solid Geometry, Trigonometry and 
Surveying; in Latin, Harper's Beginning Book, four books of Caesar, 
six orations of Cicero, six books of Virgil, two books of Livy, and one 
term in Horace; Ahn's Course in German and 200 pages of German 
literature; Ahn's Course in French and 400 pages of French literature; 
ten terms' work in the sciences, using the text-books noticed elsewhere, 
but also doing a large amount of laboratory work; President Brownson's 
Notes on English and American Literature are made the basis of four 
terms' work, the class reading widely from English and American 
literature, and studying carefully the leading biographical notices of the 
great writers and criticisms of their works; General History, Political 
Economy and Psychology occupy four terms of work. It is at once 
seen that this is a superior course, requiring faithful work by students 
well prepared to enter it, if it is completed in four years. 



16 



... McMINNVILLE COLLEGE ... 



COLLEGE PREPARATORY COURSE 



Many students desiring the advantages of the college are not far 
enough advanced to enter the regular college classes. For the benefit 
of such students, a College Preparatory course of two years is offered. 
Some of the studies of this course are common school studies. It is 
confidently believed, however, that many students would save a full 
year of valuable time by entering this course as soon as they are fitted 
to do so. The decided majority of students ought to be ready to enter 
college at least a year earlier than they do enter. The trouble is that 
they have spent three years in doing work that they ought easily to 
have done in two. The average student who has had good advantages 
ought to be able to enter this two years course at the age of fourteen, 
then two years later enter the college course and graduate from it at 
twenty. Recognizing the importance of a thorough preparation as 
essential to the highest success in college, no pains will be spared to 
make this preparatory course one of the highest value. 

FIRST YEAR 



FALL TERM 

Arithmetic 
English Grammar 
Geography 
Mental Arithmetic 
U. S. History 
Reading 
Writing 
Spelling 



WINTER TERM 

Arithmetic 
English Grammar 
Geography 
Mental Arithmetic 
U. S. History 
Reading 
Writing 
Spelling 



SPRING TERM 

Arithmetic 
English Grammar 
Geography 
Mental Arithmetic 
U. S. History 
Reading 
Writing 
Spelling 



Arithmetic 
English Grammar 
Mental Arithmetic 
U.S. History 
Physiology 
Latin Reader 



SECOND YEAR 

El. Algebra 
English Grammar 
Mental Arithmetic 
U. S. History 
Physiology 
Latin Reader 



El. Algebra 
English Grammar 
Mental Arithmetic 
Civil Government 
Physical Geography 
Caesar 



McMINNVlLLE COLLEGE ... 17 



ENGLISH COMPOSITION AND ELOCUTION 

Under the present administration it has been the aim of the college 
to give more attention year by year to these important subjects. To 
know how to express thought upon paper clearly, forcibly and elegantly 
is a great accomplishment. To be able to speak before an audience 
with grace and power is an attainment of no less value. Democratic 
institutions especially encourage these powers of the mind to their 
fullest development. The success of the college in teaching these 
branches is the highest encouragement to give more attention to them 
year by year than we have yet been able to do. During the present 
year more attention has been given this subjects than in any preceding 
year of the college, and there is fair prospect that during the coming 
year a still more systematic study of these subjects will receive careful 
attention. During the Freshman and Sophomore years, special atten- 
tion w r ill be given to the culture and management of the voice and to 
articulation, enunciation and emphasis. During the Junior year special 
attention w T ill be given to the preparation and delivery of orations, and 
the feature of the Senior year in this department will be the delivery of 
written and extemporaneous debates. 

A large amount of elocutionary drill is given free of charge to all 
students who desire it; especially in preparation for the society and the 
Friday night entertainments. In addition to this and in addition to 
the regular classes that may be organized in elocution, special classes 
will be organized whenever there are several students who desire to 
enter such classes and to pay a small tuition fee for this extra work. In 
connection with the work in elocution, special attention, with marked 
success, has been given to grace in gesture and movement. This import- 
ant phase of elocution will receive still more attention the coming year. 



18 ... McMINNVlLLE COLLEGE ... 



THE MUSICAL DEPARTMENT 



Recognizing that the fine arts are an important element in mental 
culture, and that attainments in instrumental and vocal music are of 
great practical value to young men and women, special effort has been 
put forth, with marked success, to make the musical department of this 
college one of the best in the state. While the aim has been to secure 
the most efficient teaching that can be secured, it has also been the 
desire of the institution to make the tuition as low as possible, in order 
that those of limited means may avail themselves of the advantages 
that are offered. Superior instruction in vocal music in classes is 
offered at merely a nominal tuition. The value of the voice culture 
that is thus secured cannot be overestimated. Its value is seen not only 
in singing but in public speaking as well. 



SIGHT=READING CLASS 

All pupils, whether they study instrumental or vocal music, should 
enter the department of sight-reading. The ability to read music at 
sight lies at the basis of a true musical education. Very few among the 
thousands who are studying music are able to read even plain hymn 
tune correctly at sight, consequently labor under great disadvantage. 



... McMlNNVlLLE COLLEGE ... 19 



MUSIC COURSE 



PIANO 

Preparatory Department 

Mathews' Twenty Lessons to a Beginner. MacDougall's Studies in 
Melody and Mason's Touch and Technics. 

First Year 

Lebert and Stark Book II. Kuhlau Sonatines, Haydn Sonatas, 
Technical Exercises and Scales from memory. 

Second Year 

Heller op. 46 and 47. Czerny op. 299, Mozart and Schubert Sona- 
tis, Spindler op. 141. Technical Studies. 

Third Year 

Cramer Studies, parts 1, 2 and 3. Bach's two part inventions. 
Kulluck's Octave Studies. Technical Studies. Mendelssohn's Songs 
without words. Beethoven Sonatas. Chopin Waltzes. Elements of 
Harmony, Emery. 

Fourth Year 

Clementi Gradus ad Parnassum, parts 1 and 2. Bach's Well -Tem- 
pered Clavichord. Chopin Nocturnes and Ballades. Concertos by 
Mendelssohn, Hummel and Beethoven; also concert pieces by Mendels- 
sohn, Weber, Rubenstein and Ljszt. Elements of Harmony, Emery. 

All pupils entering the four years' course in Piano must have a 
knowledge of the rudiments of music, and must have completed the 
work of the preparatory department or its equivalent. 

The course of study in Piano-forte playing is systematically arranged, 
and pupils who complete the course will be graduated in Music with an 
appropriate diploma. The time occupied in completing this course will 
depend upon the ability of the pupil and the proportion of time devoted 
to Musical study. 



20 ... McMINNVILLE COLLEGE .. 



EXPENSES 



Tuition is $11 a term. Room rent in the college building, unfur- 
nished room, $3, $4, $5 a term, each student, according to room. Fur- 
nished room, student to room alone, $4.50, $6, $8 a term, according to 
room. Furnished room, two students in a room, $5.50 and $7 each stu- 
dent, according to room. Fuel, each room, per year, $8, $10, $12, 
according to room. Extra elocution lessons, in classes of eight, one 
lesson a week,$i a term. Private lessons in elocution $5 a term. Vocal 
music, in class, twenty-four lessons, $1.25 a term. Private lessons in 
voice culture, on the piano, organ, banjo or guitar, one lesson a week, 
per term, 13 lessons, $8.50. Private lessons in voice culture on the 
piano, organ, banjo or guitar, one lesson a week, half term, (six lessons) 
$4. When two lessons a week are taken, a reduction of ten per cent, is 
given. Use of piano one hour a day, $3 per term. Diploma, $5. 
Chemicals for laboratory work, $3 to $5. Each student is to pay the 
actual cost of chemicals he uses. 

Ai,i, BiiylyS are To BE paid in ADVANCE. No deductions are 
made except in cases of protracted sickness. Absences of a few days 
invariably make extra work for teachers. 

Inquiry is often made as to the cost of sending a student to this 
college for a year. The expense varies somewhat according to the 
room a student occupies and whether two students room together. The 
following table covers all the necessary expenses except for lessons in 
elocution or music : highest lowest 

Table board for the school year $ 92 50 $ 92 50 

Tuition 33 00 33 00 

Fuel and Lights 9 00 18 00 

Furnished room 8 25 24 00 

Washing 7 00 10 00 

Books . ' 8 00 12 00 

$157 75 $189 50 

In addition to this, each student ought by all means to join the 
Philergian society, which will cost some $2 or $3 a year. Each student 
is also advised to join the Misssonary society which costs seventy- 
five cents a year. Each student is also advised to take either elocution 
or music lessons. This extra expense is money well spent. Counting 
in these extra expenses, and the entire cost of a year need not exceed 
$200, and in most cases need not reach that sum. At these figures, 
any young man or woman of good health ought not to hesitate a 
single minute about obtaining a college education. 



... McMINNVILLE COLLEGE ... 21 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



LOCATION 

McMinnville College is located just outside the city limits of 
McMinnville, Oregon. McMinnville is easily accessible from every part 
of the North Pacific coast, being situated on the Southern Pacific rail- 
road, west side division, 50 miles south of Portland. From all points 
south there is direct connection, by the way of Albany and Corvallis, or 
by stage from Salem to McCoy and thence by the Southern Pacific to 
McMinnville ; or from all points east and north there is direct connection 
by way of Portland. 



BUILDING AND GROUNDS 

The College has a campus of 30^ acres, admirably adapted for the 
purpose and beautiful for situation. Upon this campus there was built 
in 1882 one of the finest buildings for educational purposes to be found 
on the Pacific coast. The building is 106 feet in length, 79 in breadth, 
and four stories in height. The basement story contains accommoda- 
tions for a boarding department; the second affords a commodious chapel , 
president's rooms, class rooms, etc.; the third and fourth, recitation 
rooms, library, a number of eligible rooms for students, and Philergian 
hall. During the present year an observatory has been erected and a 
fine telescope mounted. It is an equatorial; good authority claims it to 
be the best instrument north of Mt. Hamilton. It has already given a 
new impetus to the study of the sciences. 



DISCIPLINE 

Self-government is the ideal at McMinnville College. Students are 
expected to conform to the usages of good society, and to conduct them- 
selves as they would in a refined, well-ordered home. Only those who 
are willing to do so are desired as pupils. No set of rules to cover all 
cases can be laid down. A high moral sense is necessary to guide a 
student in a society like this. If a student does not have this and it 
cannot be developed in him, his parents will be notified, after a due 
trial, to remove him from the school. This is not a reform school; 
young men are expected to give evidence of manhood, and young 
women of womanhood. 



22 ... McMINNVILLE COLLEGE ... 



TEXT=BOOKS 

Only a partial list of text-books is here given : Arithmetic White 
and Milne; grammar, Whitney, Reed and Kellogg; algebra, Robinson's 
elementary, Wentworth; geometry, trigonometry, Wentworth; general 
history, Barnes; rhetoric, Hill; physiology, Hutchinson; physical geog- 
raphy, Houston; Latin grammar, Harkness; Latin reader, Harper and 
Burgess; Harkness' Preparatory Course in Latin Prose Authors; Virgil, 
Harper; Greek grammar, Goodwin; The Beginners' Greek Book, 
White; Anabasis, Goodwin; physics, Gage; chemistry, Shepard; 
English literature, for reference, Shaw, Buckus and Brown, Welsh, 
Coppee, Arnold and Cleveland; psychology, Hill; geology, Dana; astron- 
omy, Young; French, Ahn; German, Ahn; zoology, Orton. 



THE LIBRARY 

The library has grown steadily, year by year, and is now recognized 
as one of the best college libraries on the Pacific coast, although many 
new books are imperatively needed. Valuable additions of nearly ioo 
volumes have been made the last year. The books have also 
been rearranged and classified so as to greatly facilitate their use. We 
look to the friends of the college for help to make the library still 
better. We need additions in history, English literature, biography 
and science especially. 



THE READING ROOM 

A partial list of the papers and magazines in the reading room this 
year is the following : The Examiner, Standard, Christian Herald, 
Pacific Baptist, Baptist Teacher, Baptist Union, Epworth Herald, 
Christian Advocate, Cumberland Presbyterian, Worker, Missionary 
Magazine, Home Mission Monthly, Education, North American 
Review, Review of Reviews, Missionary Review, Edinburg Review, 
Chautauquan, Educational Review, School Review, Forum, Atlantic 
Monthly, Reporter, Telephone, Dayton Herald, Voice, The Dalles 
Chronicle, Inter-Ocean, Northwestern Christian Advocate. Most of 
these will be in the reading room the coming year. Contributions to 
this room are solicited. 



... McMINNVILLE COLLEGE ... 23 



SOCIETIES 

The Philergian Society, composed of young ladies and gentlemen, 
meets regularly each Saturday evening. The exercises, consisting of 
singing, essays, debates, recitations, orations, declamations, etc., are of 
great value to the students. The special feature of the society is its 
debates upon vital questions of the day. 

The Missionary Society holds a public meeting once a month. 
During the present year these meetings have been held the third 
Sunday afternoon, and have been full of interest. 

There is also a Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. These hold meetings 
regularly for the study of the Bible and for religious culture. These 
meetings have proved to be of great benefit to many students, encourag- 
ing them in christian work and fitting them for larger usefulness in 
after years. , 



AID TO STUDENTS 

It is the aim of the college to assist worthy students in every way 
possible. The only way at present of rendering financial assistance is 
by furnishing work. During the present year several young men have 
earned a considerable part of their expenses in this way. The college 
can help students the coming year considerably by giving them work in 
improving the campus. Application for work should be made to the 
president at an early day and accompanied by suitable references. To 
a very limited extent, appeals have been made to friends and churches 
to assist young men studying for the ministry and young women fitting 
themselves for missionary service. Such persons are especially invited 
to correspond with the president. Special efforts will hereafter be put 
forth to assist such students of approved ability and fitness during the 
junior and senior years. Quite a number of students each year obtain 
work in the vicinity of the college. Several young women each year get 
opportunity to work for their board in private families. 



24 ... McMINNVILLE COLLEGE ... 



ROOMS AND BOARD 

The College Club was organized at the beginning of the year. It 
is under the general supervision of the president of the college. The 
aim is to furnish board at approximate cost. The price of table board 
is guaranteed not to exceed $2.50 per week. One feature of the club is 
that everything is purchased for cash. Buying in large quantities for 
cash, better board can be offered at $2.50 a week than a private family 
could afford to give at the same price. On the third floor of the col- 
lege building are rooms for a limited number of boys. The president's 
living rooms are on the first floor. On the same floor are rooms for a 
limited number of girls. Most of the rooms are unfurnished, except 
with a stove. Students wishing furnished rooms are requested to notify 
the president in advance. All of the rooms have high ceilings and large 
windows, and so are superior for ventilation and light. Furnished 
rooms can be obtained at reasonable price within a few minutes walk of 
the college. Quite a number of students club together and rent a house 
and board themselves, thus saving a large part of the expense. Room 
and board at private families ranges from $3.25 to $4.50 a week. 

+ 

REQUIREMENTS 

Regular attendance at chapel service, at recitations, faithful 
observance of study hours and payment of all damages to furniture and 
building. The use of tobacco in the building or on the college grounds, 
and the visiting of any saloon or billiard hall, are forbidden. 



EXAMINATIONS 

Are held from time to time, occupying the time of the regular 
recitation. As a rule examinations are also held at the close of each 
term; sometimes at the close of a study only, when it comes near the 
end of a term. All recitations and examinations are marked on a scale 
of 100, and an average of 80 is required before passing from one class to 
another. An accurate record of the standing of each student is 
preserved, both of recitations and examinations. Reports will be sent 
to parents or guardians on application . 



... McMINNVILLE COLLEGE ... 25 



SEVEN YEARS 

President Brownson has been at the head of the college seven years. 
They have been years of steady, encouraging growth. About $12,000 
has been added to the permanent endowment; two pianos secured for 
the musical department; the college campus greatly improved; 
a beginning made toward a laboratory; the library increased from 515 to 
1835 volumes; an observatory built and a fine telescope secured and 
mounted; the faculty enlarged from three salaried to five salaried 
teachers. The regular income has increased each year, it being this 
year more than twice as large as it was seven years ago. The needs, 
however, have more than kept pace with the growth. In institutions of 
learning, growth always creates demand for larger resources. A living 
college must have growing needs. The growth of this college makes 
enlarged resources a necessity to meet the 



IMMEDIATE NEEDS 

These may be briefly stated as follows : 

I. Ten thousand dollars added to the permanent endowment. 

The income must be increased in the near future. A large deficit in 
current expenses has been prevented year by year only by going 
without things that were imperatively needed. 

II. Ten scholarships of one thousand dollars each. The college 
ought not longer to allow promising young men and women to leave 
school after they have completed half the college course. Scholarships 
are needed that worthy students who have struggled heroically for three 
years and paid their own way may be able to complete their courses 
here. Who will build a monument by establishing a scholarship? 

III. A Woman's Hall. It need not be expensive. Perhaps 
$5,000 is all that need be spent in it. Year by year it becomes one of 
the most pressing needs of the college. It is the uniform testimony of 
other schools that such a building is a wise investment of funds. Is 
there not some woman, or some group of women who will at once 
become responsible for this building? 

It is easy to specify other needs; these have become imperative; 
the college ought not to have to wait long for these needs to be met. 
One thousand dollars invested in the college now will accomplish larger 
results than two thousand a few years hence. 



26 ... McMINNVILLE COLLEGE ... 



HAVE YOU MADE A WILL 

If so, did you remember McMinnville College? If you did not, will 
you not reconsider and ask the Lord if it will not be to his glory for you 
to change that will? If you have not made a will and are going to do 
so, will you not make McMinnville College one of your heirs? Do not 
write your own will. Be sure that the correct legal name of the 
institution is used. 

The following form of a bequest is suggested: "I give, devise and 
bequeath to THE TRUSTEES OF THE BAPTIST COLLEGE AT M'MINNVILLE, 

Yamhill County, State of Oregon, the sum of * * * to be used and 
appropriated for said college as they may see fit." 



A WORD TO PARENTS 

If you cannot give your sons and daughters anything else, give 
them a good education. It may call for self-denial and sacrifice on 
your part, but you can well afford to make it. Try and keep them in 
school every school day in the year. Then remember that it is of the 
utmost importance in what school you educate your sons and daughters. 
You cannot afford to educate them in any other than a Christian school. 
If you are a Baptist you cannot afford to educate them in any other than 
a Baptist school. If you are a Baptist in Oregon why not educate them 
in McMinnville College? 



SPECIAL REQUEST 

You who receive this catalogue will receive it because you are 
believed to be deeply interested in higher education. Your help in the 
building up of McMinnville College is earnestly solicited. There are 
many ways in which you can do so. You can speak a good word for 
the college. You can place this catalogue in the hands of persons 
whose thoughts and hearts may be turned to the college. You can send 
the president names of persons who might be favorably influenced by a 
catalogue or a personal letter from him. You can remember this school 
in your prayers ; you can remember it in your will. The college looks 
to you for help in one or all of these various ways. 



... McMINNVILLE COLLEGE ... 



27 



NAMES OF STUDENTS 



SENIORS 

Abbie L. Bryant Clatskanie. . 

Luella Carey Scio 

Wirt T. Fellows McMirmville 



Scientific 
Scientific 
. Classical 



Luellla M. Lynch McMinnville. Scientific 

Lyman E. Latourette Oregon City Classical 

John W. Loder Carlton Scientific 

B. May Million Stevensville, Mont Scientific 

Ida R. Pagenkopf Wellsdale Scientific 

William Scott Carlton Classical 



JUNIORS 

Edith R. Brown North Yamhill. 

Letta Fellows McMinnville 

Albert Huguelet McMinnville 

Ethlyn Million Stevensville, Mont 



Scientific 
. Classical 
Scientific 
Scientific 



SOPHOMORES 

Daisy E. Alloway The Dalles. 

Lewis Alderman Dayton 

Alice Carey Scio 

Nellie Latourette Oregon City 

Coleman Mark Aurora 

Arthur Pope McMinnville. 

Georgie Story McMinnville. 

Fanny Smith Brownsville. 



Scientific 
Scientific 

.Scientific 
. Classical 
Scientific 

. Scientific 
Scientific 
Scientific 



28 



... McMlNNVlLLE COLLEGE ... 



FRESHMEN 



Delia Baxter Dayton Normal 

Ivloyd Bennett McMinnville Business 

Bennie Blood Carlton Scientific 

Clair Brown Burns " 

Christine Carlson McMinnville Business 

Klnora Cooper " Special 

Wells Cooper " Scientific 

Helen Calbreath " 

Etta Cook " 

Dotha Daniels " 

Charles Galloway ' ' 

Zilpha V. Galloway " 

Charles Gregory Sheridan . 

Isabel M. Grover Brownsville Normal 

Melinda Harris Grand Ronde Scientific 

Charles Hoberg McMinnville " 

Flora Henderson " Normal 

Frank Hibbs " Business 

Ljtta Jacobson " Special 

Walter Ladd Amity Business 

Arthur Morgan McMinnville " 

Lettie Masterson Independence Normal 

Charles P.Nelson McMinnville Scientific 

Bergita Nelson ' ' Special 

Gertrude Palmer Dayton Normal 

May Rogers McMinnville Scientific 

John Root Newberg Business 

Paulina Rossner Dayton Special 

Frank Stetson Seattle, Wash Scientific 

Clare Stilwell McMinnville 

Edna Scofield Forest Grove " 

William Ungerman McMinnville " 

William J. Waldrip Diamond, Wash " 

Frank Weed McMinnville ' ' 

D. B. Williams Merlin 



.. McMINNVILLE COLLEGE 



29 



SECOND YEAR PREPARATORY 

B. C. Cook Portland 

Claud Engle Spokane, Wash 

Edith Eborall McMinnville 



.Scientific 
Scientific 
Scientific 



Esther Eborall McMinnville Scientific 

Sadie Funk McMinnville Business 

Mary E. Haynes Bonanza 

Jessie Henderson McMinnville 

Olive M. Lambright Sheridan 

Ira Mundinger McMinnville 

Clarence Mundinger 

Eunice Mundinger 

Gertrude Pound 

Horace Ramsey 

Francis M. Stowe 

Jessie Stout Carlton 

Fern Stout McMinnville. 

Herbert Toney McMinnville. 



FIRST YEAR PREPARATORY 



Newton Agee McMinnville 

Cora Bryant Clatskanie 

Mary Degner Owatonna, Minn. 

Lizzie Davis McMinnville 

Fred Garrison " 

Robert Henderson. " 

Myrtle Keys Tillamook 

Fred Witham Portland 



30 



... McMINNVILLE COLLEGE ... 



MUSIC AND ELOCUTION 



Daisy Alloway 
Ida Pagenkopf 
Abbie Bryant 
Lou Lynch 
Fannie Smith 
John Loder 
Willie Scott 
Caude Bngle 
Herbert Toney 



VOCAL MUSIC 

Mary Degnar 
Grace Riley 
Ella Carey 
Lettie Fellows 
Rebecca Smith 
Zilpha Galloway 
Arthur Morgan . 
Claire Brown 
Frank Weed 
Frank Stowe 



Mrs. Case 
Bergitte Nelson 
Alice Carey 
Wirt Fellows 
Lyman Latourette 
Willie Waldrip 
Arthur Pope 
Lettie Masterson 
Olive Lambright 



Daisy Alloway 
Newton Agee 
Abbie Bryant 
May Million 
Ida Pagenkopf 



INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC 

Esther Eborall 
Mary Degnar 
Maud Grover 
Nellie Latourette 
Grace Riley 



Edith Eborall 
May Franzen 
Lou Lynch 
Freda Latourette 
Ida Scofield 



Daisy Alloway 
May Million 



ELOCUTION 

Mrs. Case 
Arthur Pope 



Lou Lynch 
Horace Ramsey 



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JUL 27 



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1931 
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